Diário
Director

Independente
João de Sousa

Sábado, Outubro 16, 2021

Empresa ligada às “secretas” chinesas compilou dados de milhões de personalidades ocidentais e indianas

A Zhenhua Data organizou uma base de dados de figuras públicas americanas, australianas, inglesas, indianas e outras. Para além de incluir dados públicos recolhidos em fontes abertas, a base inclui ainda dados confidenciais como coordenadas bancárias e perfis psicológicos.

A Zhenhua Data organizou uma base de dados de figuras públicas americanas, australianas, inglesas, indianas e outras. Para além de incluir dados públicos recolhidos em fontes abertas (estado civil, data de nascimento, endereço postal, etc.), a base inclui ainda dados confidenciais como coordenadas bancárias e perfis psicológicos. Boris Johnson (e todo o seu círculo próximo…) é uma das personalidades que constam desta “lista” que foi entregue por um chinês anónimo ao universitário americano Christopher Balding (que durante anos trabalhou em Shenzhen). A base de dados está agora a ser analisada pela consultora especializada “Internet 2.0” e por vários jornais australianos, indianos, ingleses, italianos e outros.

Sobre os fins para que tal informação servia, Christopher Balding e o CEO de “Internet 2.0”, Robert Potter, são claros:

ces données semblent être utilisées pour soutenir des opérations des services de renseignement, de l’armée, de la sécurité et de l’Etat chinois dans la guerre de l’information”. Ce sont les prises de position de Wang Xuefeng, CEO de Zhenhua Data, qui ont en partie confirmé leur hypothèse. Il utilise l’application WeChat pour promouvoir la “guerre hybride”, une stratégie militaire qui allie des opérations de guerre conventionnelle, asymétrique et de cyberguerre…”

Ou seja, a Zhenhua Data produz instrumentos de guerra de informação facilmente integráveis em estratégias de guerra híbrida…

 

China Has Built a Massive Global Database for Hybrid Warfare, International Media Reports

The revelations that Chinese tech firm Zhenhua has built a database of 2.4 million individuals for intelligence operations are significant though unsurprising. A major international media investigation has revealed that a technology firm linked to the Chinese Communist Party has created and mined a global database of 2.4 million individuals – many of them political leaders, scientists, journalists and others in positions of influence – based on their online presence in order to monitor them and their networks.

By Abhijnan Rej | The Diplomat | September 14, 2020

The Indian Express, one of the media outlets that investigated the story, reported earlier today that the firm, Zhenhua Data Information Technology Co. Ltd., describes itself as a pioneer in using big data tools for “hybrid warfare.”

Hybrid warfare is a set of techniques through which a country attempts to shape the information environment in a target state by systematic influence and interference operations, alongside the use of other coercive tools, in order to achieve strategic objectives without open warfare.

The Express, along with the Australian Financial Review (AFR), Italy’s Il Foglio and The Daily Telegraph, London, was given access to a massive trove of data that Zhenhua had used to create its database by an unnamed source close to the company with help from an American academic, Christopher Balding, who taught at the elite Peking University until 2018 and had since been based in Vietnam.

The database contains the names of around 10,000 Indians – including a who’s who of the country’s political and military establishment – as well as more than 35,000 Australians, including Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

AFR notes that out of the 35,000 Australians, the database refers to 656 as “special interest” or “politically exposed” – terms whose exact meaning remains unknown. The special tags suggest that the database was mostly likely designed to be used by the Chinese government for clandestine targeting of individuals for various intelligence operations.

The database also includes names of 52,000 Americans, along with nationals from the U.K., Canada, Indonesia, Malaysia and even Papua New Guinea, AFR reports.

It also notes that in one instance the database was used to monitor “the career progression of a U.S. naval officer” who was “flagged as a future commander of a nuclear aircraft carrier.” This suggests that the database was created for predictive analytics of the kind used by social media giants.

The Express notes that Zhenhua was also interested in hundreds of Indian individuals who have been accused of “financial crime, corruption, terrorism, and smuggling of narcotics, gold, arms or wildlife.” This belies an interest of Chinese intelligence in individuals who could be potentially leveraged or otherwise exploited in specific operations, consistent with similar practices of other intelligence services globally.

While the Zhenhua database will be certainly be further analyzed by the media outlets that possess it, three things stand out about the revelations so far.

First, the timing of the data dump. P. Vaidyanathan Iyer, one of the Indian Express’ investigators of the story, tweeted earlier today that he was alerted to the database by an “academician” on May 21. It is likely that all other newspapers who now possess the database would also have been approached near simultaneously. If this is the case, then the timing of the data dump – in the third week of May – must be explained. Note that right around that time, just days before, Australia’s push for a coronavirus inquiry had attracted Beijing’s wrath. It was also weeks after the first clashes between India and China, in Eastern Ladakh and Northern Sikkim, precursors to the tense ongoing military standoff between the two countries. So, at this point what remains to be understood is the extent to which the source’s decision to dump data may or may not have been linked with these developments.

Second, it is not known whether the source (through any intermediary) had approached an American media outlet. In many ways, the decision to do so would have been natural given that more than a fifth of the database consists of U.S. citizens and the source had worked with Balding, an American who has since returned to the U.S. out of safety concerns in the run-up to today’s expose.

Third, that China maintains a database of this sort isn’t particularly surprising. Machine learning from large publicly sourced databases has emerged as a key enabler for intelligence agencies. Technology firms in the national security space maintain a keen interest in the intersection of open-source intelligence and artificial intelligence. For example, the U.S.-based Palantir Technologies, cofounded with start-up capital from the nation’s intelligence community, as well as other American firms such as Recorded Future, seek to utilize big data for intelligence solutions.

Furthermore, Chinese intelligence has a long tradition of following a “Thousand Grains of Sand” strategy“ by which it has utilized large number of ordinary Chinese citizens, as well as locals, abroad to source discrete pieces of information which can then be put together to form a larger picture.

From Beijing’s perspective it is therefore perfectly natural that the government would maintain large databases of foreign nationals and dynamically track interrelationships even when specific entries – such as family members of targets – may not be individually valuable, either as potential sources or as targets for influence operations.

This is more so the case given China’s growing investments in other national security projects that utilize artificial intelligence, such as facial recognition. The question now remains the extent to which the Chinese Ministry of State Security or other intelligence agencies may have already acted based on the Zhenhua database.

 


 


 

Une entreprise liée aux renseignements chinois a compilé les données de 2,4 millions de personnes

L’entreprise chinoise Zhenhua Data, proche du Parti communiste chinois et de son armée, est accusée d’avoir compilé les données de 2,4 millions de personnes dont de nombreuses figures publiques. Cette base de données inclut des adresses postales, des états civils, des coordonnées bancaires..

L’entreprise Zhenhua Data a compilé les données personnelles de 2,4 millions de citoyens américains, britanniques, australiens et indiens. Située à Shenzhen, cette société compte parmi ses principaux clients l’Armée populaire de libération et le Parti communiste chinois.

Cette base de données a été transférée à l’universitaire américain spécialisé en économie Christopher Balding, qui était auparavant basé à Shenzhen mais qui est retourné aux États-Unis pour des raisons de sécurité. Il a partagé les données avec Internet 2.0, un cabinet de conseil dont les clients comprennent les renseignements australiens et américains, pour qu’il puisse les analyser. Les résultats ont été publiés pour la première fois le 14 septembre par un consortium de médias, dont l’Australian Financial Review et le Daily Telegraph.

Dans un communiqué, Christopher Balding a déclaré que l’individu qui lui a fourni cette base de données s’était grandement mis en danger mais avait “rendu un service énorme” et qu’il était la preuve que “beaucoup de personnes en Chine sont préoccupées par l’autoritarisme et la surveillance du Parti communiste chinois”.

LES DONNÉES LIÉES À DES PERSONNALITÉS PUBLIQUES

Cette base de données contient les informations personnelles de 2,4 millions de personnes dont 52 000 Américains, 35 000 Australiens et près de 10 000 Britanniques, d’après les premières analyses. Y sont incluent des personnalités publiques de premier plan telles que les premiers ministres Boris Johnson et Scott Morrison et leurs proches, la famille royale, des célébrités et des personnalités militaires.

Parmi ces données, on trouve des informations disponibles publiquement sur Internet – telles que des dates de naissances, des adresses postales ou des états civils – mais également des données beaucoup plus confidentielles comme des coordonnées bancaires ou des profils psychologiques…

L’entreprise Zhenhua Data, à l’origine de cette base de données, se défend d’avoir soustrait ces informations illégalement. Interrogée par The Guardian, elle répond que “nos données sont toutes des données publiques disponibles sur Internet. Nous ne collectons pas de données. Il s’agit juste d’une intégration de données”. La société nie également toute relation avec le pouvoir chinois, arguant que ses clients sont “des organismes de recherche et des groupes d’entreprises”.

DES INFORMATIONS UTILISÉES DANS LA GUERRE DE L’INFORMATION

Reste à savoir à quelles fins sont réutilisées ces informations. La réponse n’est pas encore tout à fait claire. Pour Christopher Balding et le CEO d’Internet 2.0 Robert Potter, “ces données semblent être utilisées pour soutenir des opérations des services de renseignement, de l’armée, de la sécurité et de l’Etat chinois dans la guerre de l’information”.

Ce sont les prises de position de Wang Xuefeng, CEO de Zhenhua Data, qui ont en partie confirmé leur hypothèse. Il utilise l’application WeChat pour promouvoir la “guerre hybride”, une stratégie militaire qui allie des opérations de guerre conventionnelle, asymétrique et de cyberguerre. Ce concept illustre notamment le mode de guerre du Hezbollah, adaptant l’armement conventionnel à des tactiques irrégulières lui permettant de tenir tête à l’armée technologiquement et numériquement supérieure d’Israël.

AUGMENTER LES DÉPENSES EN CYBERSÉCURITÉ

Pour les deux spécialistes, “les sociétés libérales ne saisissent pas les menaces incarnées par le communisme autoritaire chinois en ignorant les guerres non traditionnelles et les opérations d’influence”. “La guerre d’information menée par Zhenhua s’attaque aux institutions clés des démocraties en visant des cibles comme les enfants des politiciens, les universités et les secteurs industriels majeurs. Ces derniers sont impliqués dans la transmission de l’information et la formation des politiques”, poursuivent-ils.

D’où l’importance d’augmenter les dépenses en cybersécurité, d’après le ministre australien de l’Energie, Angus Taylor. Suite à une campagne d’attaques informatiques, l’Australie a récemment annoncé une augmentation de son budget de 926,1 millions de dollars sur 10 ans pour renforcer sa lutte contre les cyberattaques.

Un discours similaire est tenu par le commissaire européen au marché intérieur Thierry Breton qui appelle l’Europe à se doter d’une capacité de “cyberdissuasion”.

ALICE VITARD

 


Exclusivo Tornado / IntelNomics


Receba a nossa newsletter

Contorne o cinzentismo dominante subscrevendo a Newsletter do Jornal Tornado. Oferecemos-lhe ângulos de visão e análise que não encontrará disponíveis na imprensa mainstream.

 

Receba a nossa newsletter

Contorne o cinzentismo dominante subscrevendo a nossa Newsletter. Oferecemos-lhe ângulos de visão e análise que não encontrará disponíveis na imprensa mainstream.

- Publicidade -

Outros artigos

- Publicidade -

Últimas notícias

Mais lidos

- Publicidade -